spacer spacer Go to Kaye and Laby Home spacer
spacer
spacer spacer spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer spacer

You are here:

spacer

Chapter: 2 General physics
    Section: 2.3 Temperature and heat
        SubSection: 2.3.1 The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90)

spacer
spacer

spacer

« Previous Section

Next Subsection »

Unless otherwise stated this page contains Version 1.0 content (Read more about versions)

2.3 Temperature and heat

2.3.1 The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90)

The history of the ITS-90

The International Temperature Scale was adopted in 1927 to overcome the practical difficulties of the direct realization of thermodynamic temperatures by gas thermometry and to unify existing temperature scales. It was introduced by the Seventh General Conference on Weights and Measures with the intention of producing a practical scale of temperature which was easily and accurately reproducible and which gave as nearly as possible thermodynamic temperatures. The Scale was revised in 1948, amended in 1960 (the numerical values of temperature remaining the same as in 1948) and revised again in 1968 and 1990. The International Temperature Scale of 1990 was adopted by the International Committee for Weights and Measures at its meeting in 1989, in accordance with the request embodied in Resolution 7 of the 18th General Conference of Weights and Measures of 1987 (see Metrologia 27 1990). This Scale supersedes the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1968 (amended edition of 1975) and the 1976 Provisional 0.5 K to 30 K Temperature Scale. The 1990 revision reduced the lower limit of the Scale from 13.8 K to 0.65 K and the values of the defining fixed points of the new Scale were adjusted to conform as closely as possible to thermodynamic temperatures. The differences between temperatures measured on ITS-90 and corresponding temperatures on IPTS-68 are significant and are given in the table below.

Units of temperature

The unit of the fundamental physical quantity known as thermodynamic temperature, symbol T, is the kelvin, symbol K, defined as the fraction 1/273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water.

Because of the way earlier temperature scales were defined, it remains common practice to express a temperature in terms of its difference from 273.15 K, the ice point. A thermodynamic temperature, T, expressed in this way is known as a Celsius temperature symbol t, defined by:


   t/°C = T/K − 273.15


The unit of Celsius temperature is the degree Celsius, symbol °C, which is by definition equal in magnitude to the kelvin. A difference of temperature may be expressed in kelvins or degrees Celsius.

The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) defines both International Kelvin Temperatures, symbol T90, and International Celsius Temperatures, symbol t90. The relation between T90 and t90 is the same as that between T and t, i.e.:

   t90/°C = T90/K − 273.15

The unit of the physical quantity T90 is the kelvin, symbol K, and the unit of the physical quantity t90 is the degree Celsius, symbol °C, as is the case for the thermodynamic temperature T and the Celsius temperature t.


Principles of the ITS-90

The ITS-90 extends upwards from 0.65 K to the highest temperature practicably measurable in terms of the Planck radiation law using monochromatic radiation. The ITS-90 comprises a number of ranges and sub-ranges throughout each of which temperatures T90 are defined. Several of these ranges or sub-ranges overlap, and where such overlapping occurs differing definitions of T90 exist: these differing definitions have equal status. For measurements of the very highest precision there may be detectable numerical differences between measurements made at the same temperature but in accordance with differing definitions.

Comptes Rendus des Séances de la Treizième Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures (1967–1968). Resolutions 3 and 4, p. 104.

Similarly, even using one definition, at a temperature between defining fixed points two acceptable interpolating instruments (e.g. resistance thermometers) may give detectably differing numerical values of T90. In virtually all cases these differences are of negligible practical importance and are at the minimum level consistent with a scale of no more than reasonable complexity.


The differences between ITS-90 and EPT-76, and between ITS-90 and IPTS-68


(T90T76)/mK

T90/K

 0

  1

  2

  3

  4

  5

  6

  7

  8

  9

0  

 

 

 

 

 

−0.1

−0.2

−0.3

−0.4

−0.5

10  

−0.6

−0.7

−0.8

−1.0

−1.1

−1.3

−1.4

−1.6

−1.8

−2.0

20  

−2.2

−2.5

−2.7

−3.0

−3.2

−3.5

−3.8

−4.1

 

 

(T90T68)/K

T90/K 

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10  

 

 

 

 

−0.006

−0.003

−0.004

−0.006

−0.008

−0.009

20  

−0.009

−0.008

−0.007

−0.007

−0.006

−0.005

−0.004

−0.004

−0.005

−0.006

30  

−0.006

−0.007

−0.008

−0.008

−0.008

−0.007

−0.007

−0.007

−0.006

−0.006

40  

−0.006

−0.006

−0.006

−0.006

−0.006

−0.007

−0.007

−0.007

−0.006

−0.006

50  

−0.006

−0.005

−0.005

−0.004

−0.003

−0.002

−0.001

−0.000

−0.001

−0.002

60  

  0.003

  0.003

  0.004

  0.004

  0.005

  0.005

  0.006

  0.006

  0.007

  0.007

70  

  0.007

  0.007

  0.007

  0.007

  0.007

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

80  

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

90  

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.008

  0.009

  0.009

  0.009

T90/K

0  

10   

20   

30   

40   

50   

60   

70   

80   

90   

100  

 0.009

0.011

0.013

0.014

0.014

0.014

0.014

0.013

0.012

0.012

200  

 0.011

0.010

0.009

0.008

0.007

0.005

0.003

0.001

 

 


(t90t68)/°C

t90/°C

0

−10 

−20 

−30 

−40 

−50 

−60 

−70 

−80 

−90 

−100  

 0.013

0.013

0.014

0.014

0.014

0.013

0.012

0.010

0.008

0.008

0  

 0.000

0.002

0.004

0.006

0.008

0.009

0.010

0.011

0.012

0.012

t90/°C

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

0  

  0.000

 −0.002 

−0.005

−0.007

−0.010

−0.013

−0.016

−0.018

−0.021

−0.024

100  

−0.026

−0.028

−0.030

−0.032

−0.034

−0.036

−0.037

−0.038

−0.039

−0.039

200  

−0.040

−0.040

−0.040

−0.040

−0.040

−0.040

−0.040

−0.039

−0.039

−0.039

300  

−0.039

−0.039

−0.039

−0.040

−0.040

−0.041

−0.042

−0.043

−0.045

−0.046

400  

−0.048

−0.051

−0.053

−0.056

−0.059

−0.062

−0.065

−0.068

−0.072

−0.075

500  

−0.079

−0.083

−0.087

  −0.090  

−0.094

−0.098

−0.101

−0.105

−0.108

−0.112

t90/°C

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

600  

  −0.115

  −0.118

  −0.122

  −0.125*

−0.11  

−0.10  

−0.09  

−0.07  

−0.05 

−0.04  

700  

−0.02

−0.01

  0.00

 0.02

 0.03

 0.03

 0.04

 0.05

 0.05

 0.05

800  

  0.05

  0.05

  0.04

 0.04

 0.03

 0.02

 0.01

 0.00

−0.02 

−0.03  

900  

−0.05

−0.06

−0.08

−0.10

−0.11  

−0.13  

−0.15  

−0.16  

−0.18 

−0.19  

1000  

−0.20

−0.22

−0.23

−0.23

−0.24  

−0.25  

−0.25  

−0.25  

−0.26 

−0.26  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1000  

   

−0.26

−0.30

−0.35

−0.39

−0.44

−0.49

−0.54

−0.60

−0.66

2000  

−0.72

−0.79

−0.85

−0.93

−1.00

−1.07

−1.15

−1.24

−1.32

−1.41

3000  

−1.50

−1.59

−1.69

 −1.78 

−1.89

−1.99

−2.10

−2.21

−2.32

−2.43


    * A discontinuity in the first derivative of (t90t68) occurs at temperature of t90 = 630.6°C when (t90t68) = − 0.125°C


The ITS-90 has been constructed in such a way that, throughout its range, for any given temperature the numerical value of T90 is a close approximation to the numerical value of T according to best estimates at the time the scale was adopted. By comparison with direct measurements of thermodynamic temperatures, measurements of T90 are more easily made, are more precise and are highly reproducible.

Definition of the ITS-90

Between 0.65 K and 5.0 K T90 is defined in terms of the vapour-pressure temperature relations of 3He and 4He.

Between 3.0 K and the triple point of neon (24.5561 K) T90 is defined by means of a helium gas thermometer calibrated at three experimentally realizable temperatures having assigned numerical values (defining fixed points) and using specified interpolation procedures.

Between the triple point of equilibrium hydrogen (13.8033 K) and the freezing point of silver (961.78 °C) T90 is defined by means of platinum resistance thermometers calibrated at specified sets of defining fixed points and using specified interpolation procedures.

Above the freezing point of silver (961.78 °C) T90 is defined in terms of a defining fixed point and the Planck radiation law.

The defining fixed points of ITS-90 and some selected secondary reference points

Equilibrium state

T90(K)

  Cd superconducting transition point   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 0.519    
  Zn superconducting transition point    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 0.851    
  Al superconducting transition point    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 1.1796  
4He Lambda point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 2.1768  
  In superconducting transition point    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 3.4145  
4He boiling point  .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 4.2221  
  Pb superconducting transition point   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 7.1996  
*Triple point of equilibrium hydrogen  .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 13.8033  
*Boiling point of equilibrium hydrogen at a pressure of 33 330.6 pascals (25/76  standard atmosphere)       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 17.0357  
*Boiling point of equilibrium hydrogen    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 20.2711  
*Ne triple point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 24.5561  
  Ne boiling point   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 27.098    
*O2 triple point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .     54.3584  
  N2 triple point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 63.150
  N2 boiling point  .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 77.352
*Ar triple point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 83.8058
  O2 condensation point      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    90.196
  Kr triple point    .    .    .    .    .    .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .  115.776
  CO2 sublimation point      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    194.685
*Hg triple point   .    .    .    .    .    .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   234.3156
  H2O freezing point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .  273.15
*H2O triple point .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .     273.16
*Ga melting point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 302.9146
  H2O boiling point   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .     373.124
*In freezing point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 429.7485
*Sn freezing point    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 505.078
  Bi freezing point    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 544.553
  Cd freezing point   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 594.219
*Cu freezing point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 1357.77
  Ni freezing point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 1728
  Co freezing point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 1768
  Pd freezing point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 1827
  Pt freezing point      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 2041
  Rh freezing point     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .  2235
  Ir freezing point       .    .    .    .    .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 2719
  W freezing point      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    . 3693

    * Defining point of ITS-90.
       All except the triple points and the hydrogen boiling point at 33 330.6 Pa are at a pressure of 101.325 Pa (1 standard atmosphere).

References

Metrologia (1990) 27, 3–10 and 107; Metrologia (1994) 31, 149–153

T.J.Quinn

spacer


spacer
spacer
spacer spacer spacer

Home | About | Table of Contents | Advanced Search | Copyright | Feedback | Privacy | ^ Top of Page ^

spacer

This site is hosted and maintained by the National Physical Laboratory © 2017.

spacer